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Richard Burnside, The Ancient King with Attendants, 1991. Enamel on
canvas. Courtesy of the South Carolina Arts Commission State Art
Collection Program.

The African American Voice: Works from the State Art Collection of South Carolina
AUGUST 1–OCTOBER 4, 2015

This exhibition includes forty works of art in several media—paintings, drawings, and sculpture—from the State Art Collection of South Carolina. These artworks were created in recent times by twenty-five celebrated African American artists, all of whom have close ties to the state. The exhibition includes work by famed outsider artists Sam Doyle, Leroy Marshall, Richard Burnside, and Dan Robert Miller, as well as work by academically trained artists Leo Twiggs, Arthur Rose, Tarleton Blackwell, Mac Arthur Goodwin, Jesse Guinyard, Joseph Gandy, Terry K. Hunter, Larry Jordan, Larry Lebby, Robert Spencer, and Winston Wingo.


Nathan Bindler
Robert Stark, November 17, 2014. Oil on linen. Courtesy of the artist.

The New American Landscape: Paintings by Robert Stark
AUGUST 15–NOVEMBER 8, 2015

Artist Robert Stark has lived and painted in Union Dale, Pennsylvania, for forty years. He also maintains a studio on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, where he and his wife spend their winters. His work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C.; Cheekwood Museum of Art in Nashville, Tennessee; the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art in Johnstown, Pennsylvania; and ArtWorks in Cincinnati, Ohio, to cite just a few. His paintings have traveled to more than 140 world capitals under the U.S. Department of State’s Art in Embassies program. He is represented in museum, corporate, and private collections all over the United States.


Edwin Forbes
John Lotton, Untitled, undated. Collection of Eugene Fleischer..

Contemporary American Studio Glass from the Collection of Eugene Fleischer
JUNE 13–SEPTEMBER 6, 2015

The history of American studio glass is eventful but relatively brief. Considered by many to be the father of the American studio glass movement, Harvey Littleton (1922–2013) began experimenting with hot glass in 1959. He had grown up in the shadow of the Corning Glass Works, where his father served as the head of research and development in the 1930s. Littleton is represented in the present exhibition, as are many of the leading glass artists working today. The collection, still a work in progress, was begun some years ago by Augustan Eugene Fleischer, an avid collector of many kinds of things since he was a boy. Among the glass artists represented in the exhibition are Rick Beck, Audrey Handler, Jon Kuhn, Charles Lotton, Mark Peiser, Stephen Rolfe Powell, and Lisabeth Sterling. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog published by the Morris Museum of Art.


Eugene Thomason
Allen Stuart, Red-breasted Merganser Drake, undated. Collection
of Dr. Lloyd Newberry.

Decoys from the Collection of Dr. Lloyd Newberry
SEPTEMBER 12–DECEMBER 1, 2015

Dr. Lloyd Newberry, an avid big-game hunter, author, and retired educator, began collecting decoys in the late 1960s. Fascinated by the wooden birds, he took several trips northward along the East Coast from his Georgia home, seeking out fellow decoy collectors, antique shops, and carvers, purchasing a variety of hand-carved, painted birds and listening to the stories of craftsmen and hunters. Today early American decoys are highly collectible and widely recognized as a true form of early American folk art.


Eugene Thomason
Dale Kennington, It’s a Man’s World, 1996. Oil on canvas.
Collection of Michael A. Mennello.

Real Lives: Observations and Reflections by Dale Kennington
OCTOBER 17, 2015–JANUARY 3, 2016

Organized by the Friends of the Mennello Museum of American Art, the exhibition features nearly thirty paintings by acclaimed realist Dale Kennington. Born in Savannah, Georgia, in 1935, she earned a BA in art history from the University of Alabama in 1956 before marrying and moving to Dothan, Alabama. She turned to painting in her early forties because she wanted portraits of her children; years later, she gave up portraiture for the kind of work for which she has become famous. The recipient of many accolades and honors over the years, she was recognized by the Alabama State Council on the Arts with a Governor’s Arts Award in 2011.

>Past Exhibitions

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