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MORRIS MUSEUM OF ART

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STILL LIFE

During the nineteenth century, the prosperity of a young America led to an increasing appreciation of still-life painting among middle-class Americans. Although considered an inferior form of painting by art critics, artists often painted still-life work on the side, selling it for an affordable price to a middle-class audience seeking to decorate their homes, clubs, and offices. It is not surprising that throughout much of the mid-nineteenth century, images of fruit and flowers were the most popular, followed by those of hunting game. The abundance and affluence of a thriving nineteenth-century America, with its Western frontier and its increased industrialization, coexisted with a growing interest in examining science and nature.

Highlights (Click on an image for object details)
"An Abundance of Fruit" by Andrew John Henry Way
An Abundance of Fruit
By Andrew John Henry Way
c. 1875
"Floral Still Life" by Carl J. Blenner
Floral Still Life
By Carl J. Blenner
undated
"Roses" by George Cochran Lambdin
Roses
By George Cochran Lambdin
1876
"Still Life" by Willie Betty Newman
Still Life
By Willie Betty Newman
c. 1900
"Still Life" by Thomas Wightman
Still Life
By Thomas Wightman
1861
"Still Life with Brilliant Cut Glass" by Hal Alexander Courtney Morrison
Still Life with Brilliant Cut Glass
By Hal Alexander Courtney Morrison
c. 1890
"Table Top Still Life" by Wenonah Day Bell
Table Top Still Life
By Wenonah Day Bell
c. 1930

"Two Magnolia Blossoms in a Glass Vase" by Martin Johnson Heade
Two Magnolia Blossoms in a Glass Vase
By Martin Johnson Heade
c. 1890

Museum Hours: Tuesday–Saturday: 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. • Sunday: Noon–5:00 p.m. • Closed Mondays and major holidays
Visit the Morris at 1 Tenth Street • Augusta, Georgia 30901 • p. 706-724-7501 • f. 706-724-7612

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